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Organized around seven aesthetic principles, highlights indigenous ingredients, traditional recipes, and contemporary recipes with ancient roots.With enticing food photography and images from the museum’s collection, this cookbook is a testament to the Native contribution to American cuisine., five renowned scholars of Native art show how historical and contemporary Anishinaabe artists have expressed the spiritual and social dimensions of their relations with the Great Lakes region. Phillips, and Gerald Mc Master—explore the ways in which the artists have depicted stories, histories, and experiences of the Great Lakes.Illustrated with nearly 100 color images, the book features works by modern masters such as Norval Morrisseau, George Morrison, and Blake Debassige as well as traditional objects such as painted drums, carved containers, and bags embroidered with porcupine quills. The authors also discuss how the artists, in their work, have accommodated, incorporated, or challenged newcomers.“In [this] memorable book, Indian people use words, actions, and artifacts to represent themselves as fully human, free at last from the soul-cramping and spirit-reducing tests of authenticity and purity.” For the first Americans, a record of the past is written in the objects that were a part of daily life.Values, traditions, and beliefs are embodied in works of Native creativity, from children’s toys to leaders’ war shirts, and from Arctic kayaks to masks made by the people of Tierra del Fuego.is an illustrated overview of the intricate sculptural jewelry created by Denise Wallace (Chugach Aleut) and her non-Native husband and partner, Samuel Wallace.

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Horse Capture (A’aninin) to a memoir of a Hopi lunch featuring blue corn piki bread, stews, and domed pies by Thomas Sweeney (Citizen Band Potawatomi).Even more dramatic is the increasing number of Indian-run museums.These essays explore the relationships being forged between museums and Native communities to create new techniques for presenting Native American culture.Lushly illustrated with more than 150 never-before-published photographs, this retrospective represents the first major publication of Horace Poolaw's photography.Poolaw, a Kiowa Indian from Anadarko, Oklahoma, documented his community during a time of great change, witnessing with his camera the transformations that each decade of the twentieth century brought to his multi-tribal community.

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