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Which ceased to exist at or about the time that George Blumer died in 1867. The vessel's initial owner was 'Gregory & Co.', of Blyth, intended for use, it would appear, in the Baltic & Mediterranean trades.

Now Luke Blumer (2) was the fifth son of Luke Blumer (1757/1840) (1), the son of a blacksmith from Soho, London. Initially registered, presumably in error, as 'Matfon' - an 1861/62 typo!

At that time, I am advised, a time before welding became the norm, masts were riveted together. Firstly there is, on site, a 'Blumer' build list from its earliest days in 1859 thru to the very end. And he has assembled a list of 18 vessels constructed at North Sands in the years of 1859 through 1865. 'Where Ships Are Born' indicates that the Avon was 'in some records credited to Pace, Blumer's foreman, but the explanation might be that Pace had a share in the business during those early days'. In view of the business name of 'Pace, Blumer' referred to above. Built, it would seem for Gayner of Sunderland, & owned as to 48/64 by R.

Shipbuilding was in the Fraser family's blood - a common Sunderland story perhaps. Michael's data is now included in the 'Blumer' build list now on site. The webmaster has a limited number of 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him (image at left) &, for what would appear to be Avon's entire life, they record 'Pace' as the builder.

I should add that the fine New Zealand based 'Miramar' site ('search by shipbuilder' link & type in 'Blumer') indicates the following business names that were also used i) 'Pace, Blumer', ii) 'Haswell & Blumer' & iii) 'J. I am not sure at what periods in time such names were in actual use. Much of above data originated with Mori Flapan of Sydney, Australia (thanks again!

However, the 'Pace' of 'Pace, Blumer' refers to Robert Pace, a shipwright who was foreman for George Booth.

The partnership which existed prior to that date, the partnership of Arthur Robson & John Blumer, styled 'John Blumer and Co.' was then dissolved. The 1883/84 edition of 'Lloyd's' notes the vessel to be 'missing'. Thanks to Sheila Buttinger we now know a little more. (Thomas) Gilhespie was reported dead at sea in 1883 - drowned as a result of the total wreck, on Jan. While en route from Seaham to Devonport with Ralph Davison, of Crofton Mills, Blyth, Northumberland, in command. It would seem that Robert Pace & John Blumer went into business together &, in view of the business name, it would seem that Pace was the senior partner. We do not know the exact answer to that question but it probably was from 1859 through 1864. They took over Booth's yard at North Sands when the Booth family emigrated to New Zealand in 1859. At which date, John Blumer set up his new shipbuilding business at North Dock & Robert Pace did the same at Southwick. 1875 voyage from Adelaide to Hobart with wheat etc. Andrew confirms that the association of the Pace family with the Salvation Army was very long term indeed, & is so in Australia today (in early 2009).' Is it possible that you have data about this most interesting matter? 1865, Colonel Arthur Robson joined the firm, which then became 'Blumer and Company'. The above links are mainly to vessel arrival records. It would seem that Colonel Robson was the major supplier of timber to the firm & indeed financed it. The company earned a reputation for building fine ships, & for being safe - not a life lost re any of the 40 ships it built in its first 10 years. 98.3 ft long, crew of 9 or 10, signal letters QBHG. The vessel arrived at Onehunga, Auckland, NZ, from Hobart Town, Tasmania, on May 12, 1864, with a varied cargo. 13, 1869, voyage from Melbourne to Sydney, New South Wales.

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